Why Are We Called Arbiters?

Why Are We Called Arbiters?

Is there truly a difference between an arbiter and an arbitrator? It may sound like semantics, but the distinction in calling the decision makers at Just Resolve arbiters, rather than anything else, is an important one.

From a strictly definitional standpoint:

Arbiter means a person appointed or chosen by the parties to determine any controversy between them. It also refers to any person or object having the power of judging or determining, without limitations. (i.e. Miss Manners is an arbiter of good manners.)

Arbitrator is a person to whom the power to settle or judge an arbitration hearing is delegated.

More specifically, the difference between an arbiter and an arbitrator is subtle– An arbiter can determine the outcome for any type or kind of dispute, while arbitrators can only decide disputes arising in the arbitration format, which has its own specific rules and procedures.

Why does this distinction matter? An arbiter has more freedom in the decision making process than an arbitrator, who is constrained by the rules of arbitration. This freedom can be important when you are trying to resolve a dispute quickly and efficiently.

More to read

NDR on Demand: What Happens When a Contract Doesn’t Specify How a Dispute Will Be Resolved?

The best way to deter threats of litigation and minimize the costs, duration, and distractions of resolving any dispute is to put a dispute resolution clause specifying NDR — Neutral-Driven Resolution — in all your contracts BEFORE there is a problem. That means that if a dispute should arise between a business and a contractor,…

Continue reading

They Said NDR Would Never Work. They Were Wrong.

Many people are surprised by how effective NDR can be.   Since publishing my book and speaking at events about NDR (Neutral-Driven Resolution), I’ve often been asked a simple question: Does it work? And if it really does lower the costs and the time it takes to settle common disputes, why doesn’t everybody know about…

Continue reading

“Morgan Hill author releases new book”

The Morgan Hill Times featured Rob’s new book in an article ahead of his “Meet the Author” night at Booksmart. “Legal disputes and conflicts cost businesses billions of dollars a year in lawyers’ fees, lost productivity, time and aggravation. A new book by Morgan Hill author Robert Christopher proposes an innovative, faster and simpler way…

Continue reading

Not All Disputes are Equal

Not all business and legal disputes are alike, and not all of them can be resolved in the same way. In writing my book Just Right: How Neutral-Driven Resolution Can Close the Gap in American Civil Justice, it was important to distinguish the types of common disputes for which NDR is most suitable.  As readers…

Continue reading